Civil Society under Attack in Liberia: Green Advocates Staff in Hiding after Threats from Police

(Ottawa—November 4, 2016)

Partnership Africa Canada is calling on the Liberian government to immediately ensure the safety and security of staff of a national civil society organization promoting natural resource governance—Green Advocates—after threats have forced its members to go into hiding.

Arrest warrants have been issued for the staff of Green Advocates including its Executive Director, Alfred Brownell. According to reports, Liberian police surrounded the organization's offices, invaded Brownell's home, and briefly arrested his uncle. Currently, Brownell and Green Advocates staff are in hiding.

"Partnership Africa Canada has worked closely with Green Advocates and Alfred for many years to promote natural resource governance in Liberia and throughout the West Africa region. They are renowned for their efforts to bring transparency and advocate for human rights in the natural resource sector," said Joanne Lebert, Partnership Africa Canada's Executive Director.

"The role of civil society is integral—and the Liberian government must take immediate steps to ensure the security of Green Advocates staff is restored," Lebert added.

Green Advocates promotes equal access to land and natural resources in solidarity with rural and impoverished communities. They are a member of Publish What You Pay-Liberia, Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), and the Kimberley Process Civil Society Coalition.

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For more information:
Zuzia Danielski, Communications Director
+613-237-6768 x. 10 / +1-613-263-0661
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Partnership Africa Canada (PAC) is a global leader in developing innovative approaches to strengthen natural resource governance in conflict and high-risk areas. For 30 years, PAC has collaborated with partners to promote policy dialogue and capacity-building—including through the establishment of the Kimberley Process, which earned PAC a Nobel Peace Prize nomination in 2003.